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Speak to the mountain

“And Jesus answered them, Truly I say to you, if you have faith and do not doubt, you will not only do what has been done to the fig tree, but even if you say to this mountain, Be taken up and cast into the sea, it will be done” – Matthew 21:21.

We’ve all had seasons when the challenges of life feel overwhelming. During those times, it’s easy to be tempted to talk about how bad things are. Maybe you received a bad medical report, or maybe you’re facing a financial obstacle. But the more you talk about something, the bigger it becomes in your mind. Instead, you’ve got to dig your heels in and say, “No, I am not going to give life to that defeat. I am not going to speak sickness over myself. I’m not going to speak lack. I’m not going to speak fear. I’m choosing a different report. I believe the report of the Lord which says I am blessed. I am favoured. I am prosperous. I am healthy. I am whole. I’m a victor, not a victim.”

Remember, even if you don’t see how things could ever work out, God does. You’ve got to speak to those mountains in your life and declare favour over those situations. Instead of talking to God about how big your problems are, talk to your problems about how big your God is! As you speak to your mountains, they will be moved, and you will move forward into the victory God has prepared for you.

Inspiration

An Awesome story very inspiring………………….

If you have ever been to a Perlman concert, you know that getting on stage is no small achievement for him. He was stricken with polio as a child, and so he has braces on both legs and walks with the aid of two crutches. To see him walk across the stage one step at a time, painfully and slowly, is an awesome sight.

He walks painfully, yet majestically, until he reaches his chair. Then he sits down, slowly, puts his crutches on the floor, undoes the clasps on his legs, tucks one foot back and extends the other foot forward. Then he bends down and picks up the violin, puts it under his chin, nods to the conductor and proceeds to play.

By now, the audience is used to this ritual. They sit quietly while he makes his way across the stage to his chair. They remain reverently silent while he undoes the clasps on his legs. They wait until he is ready to play. But this time, something went wrong. Just as he finished the first few bars, one of the strings on his violin broke. You could hear it snap, it went off like gunfire across the room. There was no mistaking what that sound meant. There was no mistaking what he had to do.

We figured that he would have to get up, put on the clasps again, pick up the crutches and limp his way off stage, to either find another violin or else find another string for this one. But he didn’t. Instead, he waited a moment, closed his eyes and then signalled the conductor to begin again. The orchestra began, and he played from where he had left off. And he played with such passion and such power and such purity as they had never heard before.

Of course, anyone knows that it is impossible to play a symphonic work with just three strings. I know that, and you know that, but that night Itzhak Perlman refused to know that. You could see him modulating, changing, re-composing the piece in his head. At one point, it sounded like he was de-tuning the strings to get new sounds from them that they had never made before. When he finished, there was an awesome silence in the room. And then people rose and cheered. There was an extraordinary outburst of applause from every corner of the auditorium. We were all on our feet, screaming and cheering; doing everything we could to show how much we appreciated what he had done.

He smiled, wiped the sweat from this brow, raised his bow to quiet us, and then he said, not boastfully, but in a quiet, pensive, reverent tone, “You know, sometimes it is the artist’s task to find out how much music you can still make with what you have left.”

Whatever circumstances you are in, try to make the best out it. Remember the people living in worst of conditions in different parts of the world.

Full of consciousness

“Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, that we might know the things that have been freely given to us by God.” – 1 Corinthians 2:12

You are probably familiar with the story of how David, with a sling and a stone, slew Goliath, a 10-feet-tall Philistine warrior. But have you ever wondered why David succeeded while the others in the army of Israel did not even dare to face Goliath? David’s secret was that he was only conscious of victory and not defeat, because he knew a God who had rescued him time and again.

You can just imagine him saying, “One day, I was taking care of my sheep when a lion came and took one of them. I was not willing to settle for that, I went after the lion, caught it by its beard and smote it. The Lord delivered me from the lion’s mouth. On another occasion, a bear came and took one of my flock. I went after the bear and smote it. So the Lord delivered me from the bear too. This same God, who delivered me from the paws of the lion and bear, will also deliver me from this Philistine.” (1 Samuel 17:34–37) David was conscious of what God had done for him. He knew that God was for him, loved him, favored him and would give him victory again.

You can also remind yourself that the same God, who did tremendous things for you in the past, will do the same for you again. Be like David, who was conscious only of God’s goodness and faithfulness. Don’t be like the army of Israel. The men were conscious of the negative words of Goliath. I believe that they must have talked about his threats, repeating his words to one another, and as a result, filled their hearts with fear. (1 Samuel 17:11, 24) Do not water the seed of fear in your heart, rather uproot it. Pump yourself up with God’s Word until you are full of the Spirit and consciousness of God, so that you might know the things that have been freely given to you by God.

Quick nudges

“But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you” – John 14:26.

“There is a story about a boy flying a kite. The kite was so high that it had disappeared into the clouds. A man came by and asked, ‘What are you doing, son, holding onto that string?’ The boy answered, ‘I’ve got a kite up there.’ The man looked up and said, ‘I don’t see it.’ The boy replied, ‘Well, I know it’s there because I can feel the tug.’ That’s like the witness of the Holy Spirit within us. We may not see the evidence, but we feel a tug in our hearts constantly, letting us know that we are in touch with God. That is the witness of the Holy Spirit.”

“I have determined that throughout each day I will be alert to the Holy Spirit’s working in my life. For example, one Sunday afternoon when I was about to sit down and relax with the newspaper, I suddenly remembered a relative whom I knew was lonely. I silently thanked the Lord for the quiet nudge and proceeded to follow through by visiting with my relative for part of the afternoon. I have come to realize that there is an effort required of us if we are to progress in the Christian life. But we need to trust God and rest in Him so that we can be aware of His quiet nudges” (Lorraine Joy Burt).

A firm grip of heaven

“For our citizenship is in heaven, from which also we eagerly wait for a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ; who will transform the body of our humble state into conformity with the body of His glory, by the exertion of the power that He has even to subject all things to Himself” – Philippians 3:20-21.

“Nothing can be compared with the home going of a believer who says goodbye here to all of the suffering, difficulties and the problems in this life, and then is surrounded immediately by angels and carried by them to a glorious welcome in Heaven. That is the reason I believe that death can be beautiful. I have known people to die with expressions of triumph on their faces.
No wonder the Bible says, ‘Precious in the sight of the LORD is the death of His godly ones.’ (Psalm 116:15).

No wonder David said, ‘Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I fear no evil, for You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me’ (Psalm 23:4). Many who read this may be fearing and dreading death. You may be in a hospital room, and soon God will be calling you to Himself. At the moment you are suffering, but because of Christ in another moment you will be transformed. The glories, beauties, splendor and grandeur of Heaven will soon be yours. If you know Christ, you can put your trust and confidence in Him because He died for you, and in that last moment, the greatest crisis of all, God will have His angels there to carry you gloriously, wonderfully into Heaven.