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Being someone else’s miracle

This was written by a Metro Denver Hospice Physician:

I was driving home from a meeting this evening about 5, stuck in traffic on Colorado Blvd., and the car started to choke and splutter and die – I barely managed to coast, into a gas station, glad only that I would not be blocking traffic and would have a somewhat warm spot to wait for the tow truck. It wouldn’t even turn over. Before I could make the call, I saw a woman walking out of the ‘quickie mart ‘ building, and it looked like she slipped on some ice and fell into a gas pump, so I got out to see if she was okay.

When I got there, it looked more like she had been overcome by sobs than that she had fallen; she was a young woman who looked really haggard with dark circles under her eyes She dropped something as I helped her up, and I picked it up to give it to her. It was a nickel.

At that moment, everything came into focus for me: the crying woman, the ancient Suburban crammed full of stuff with 3 kids in the back (1 in a car seat), and the gas pump reading $4.95.

I asked her if she was okay and if she needed help, and she just kept saying ‘I don’t want my kids to see me crying,’ so we stood on the other side of the pump from her car. She said she was driving to California and that things were very hard for her right now. So I asked, ‘And you were praying?’ That made her back away from me a little, but I assured her I was not a crazy person and said, ‘He heard you, and He sent me.’

I took out my card and swiped it through the card reader on the pump so she could fill up her car completely, and while it was fueling, I walked to the next door McDonald’s and bought 2 big bags of food, some gift certificates for more, and a big cup of coffee. She gave the food to the kids in the car, who attacked it like wolves, and we stood by the pump eating fries and talking a little.

She told me her name, and that she lived in Kansas City Her boyfriend left 2 months ago and she had not been able to make ends meet. She knew she wouldn’t have money to pay rent Jan 1, and finally in desperation had finally called her parents, with whom she had not spoken in about 5 years. They lived in California and said she could come live with them and try to get on her feet there.

So she packed up everything she owned in the car. She told the kids they were going to California for Christmas, but not that they were going to live there.

I gave her my gloves, a little hug and said a quick prayer with her for safety on the road. As I was walking over to my car, she said, ‘So, are you like an angel or something?’ This definitely made me cry. I said, ‘Sweetie, at this time of year angels are really busy, so sometimes God uses regular people.’

It was so incredible to be a part of someone else’s miracle. Of course, you guessed it. When I got in my car it started right away and got me home with no problem. I’ll put it in the shop tomorrow to check, but I suspect the mechanic won’t find anything wrong.

Sometimes the angels fly close enough to you that you can hear the flutter of their wings…

Psalms 55:22 – “Cast thy burden upon the Lord, and He shall sustain thee. He shall never suffer the righteous to be moved.”

You are Somebody’s Miracle

“We are therefore Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us” – 2 Corinthians 5:20.

As a believer, God wants to do His work on the earth through you. You are His ambassador or representative. You have been given His authority and power. It’s easy to get focused on this natural realm and all the things that we need, but do you realize that you are equipped to be somebody else’s miracle?

Every single day, we have opportunities to show God’s love and compassion to others. We have the opportunity to meet their needs, bring them healing, and offer hope and encouragement. Every day, we can sow good seed into the lives of others that will reap an eternal harvest.

I encourage you today to look for ways to be a blessing to someone else. When you pour into others and help meet their needs, God will make sure that others pour into you. Let’s continue to work together to build His kingdom to the glory of God!

A Miracle Of Miracles: Realizing An Impossible Dream...

“So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will, they soon become inevitable.” Christopher Reeve

Recently, for the first time in 5 years I simply went out back, put my cane down, and started walking. I made it 42 yards.

Today I walked 5 miles.

My medical team had said this would be impossible. My brain could no longer send the signals for walking because those nerves in my spinal cord had been destroyed. Though certainly unintentional, my doctors did take something very important away from me: hope.

A while back, a psychologist pal of mine urged me to try to help myself. I was angry. I said, “They’re four of Boston’s leading neurologists. They all said I’d never get any better.”

“They could have all been wrong.”

“They said there’s nothing I can do! No rehabilitation. No physical therapy. I’m not putting any effort into trying to walk and then be miserable when I fail.”

“Trying is never failure.”

I’d get steaming mad at people like her. What did they know? They came out in droves. I heard various things I should try: a soy-based diet, massage, Yoga, acupuncture, positive thinking. All of these well-meaning non-experts believed that traditional medical doctors do not know everything about human potential.

However, there was a common denominator in my friends’ advice. And that was the word, “Try.”

What made me finally try? The answer is simpler than I’d have ever imagined. That day I tried walking on my own, I had simply said to myself, “Why not?”

When I walk I have a Frankenstein-style gait. I get embarrassed so I explain. I met a gal who said, “Stop excusing yourself. Walk proud!” She’s just one of the many who’ve taught me that if I open my heart to acceptance, the world is filled with support teams.

I’ve also resolved to open my obstinate mind and really listen to others, experts or not. This not only fosters my own sometimes-frail belief in my abilities; it fosters faith in miracles.

One morning my husband, Bob, said there was a huge present for me in our driveway. He had researched “bicycles for disabled people.” It was a 300 pound cycle for two. The seats were side by side. He could pedal while I sat by him and enjoyed the outdoors again.

Um . . . did I mention it came assembled with a set of pedals for me too?

Now, hundreds of miles later, after exhaustive hours of pedaling along beautiful bike trails, I only wish that we owned stock in Ben-Gay.

Bob needs a tube a day to keep up with me.

Last week he repeated, “There’s a huge present in our driveway.” He led me outside. “Voila!” he said. “Oh no,” I moaned. Bob dubbed it “The One-Woman Dynamo Power Bike.”

“Sweetheart? You know I can’t bike on my own.”

He laughed sweetly. “I know. And you can’t walk either. Then why does the pedometer I bought you have 74 miles on it?”

And so, I made a now often repeated declaration that I am praying others will say to themselves as well. “Yes. I can.”

Think I love my bike? You bet. Think I love Bob? Of course. Think I love life again after cloistering myself in a self imposed no-can-do closet? Goodness! You have to ask?

How do we find hope when hope seems impossible? Do we simply believe in our hearts, our minds and our very souls that we can beat the odds?

Yes.

Christopher Reeve said, “When we have hope, we discover powers within ourselves we may have never known. Once we choose hope, everything is possible.”

His immutable words still ring in my heart and I so hope they will in everyone else’s: “And you don’t have to be a ‘Superman’ to do it.”

~ Saralee Perel ~